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Full text of "WADCO news 1920-1923"

WADCO NEWS 



Volume 1 



Plainville, Mass., September 10, 1920 



Number 3 



RELIEF ADDS MANY 

TO MEMBERSHIP LIST 



TOOL ROOM FIRST WITH 100 PER CENT. 



Die Cutting, Polishing and Re- 
ceiving Departments All 
Reach Goal 

Two weeks ago the Mutual Relief 
Association included on its member- 
ship lists only 52 per cent, of the peo- 
ple in the shop. Today that 52 per- 
cent, has jumped to over 60 per cent, 
of the total number on the Whiting 
and Davis payroll. For two weeks, 
President W. M. Fuller and Treas- 
urer Byron Gardner have been kept 
busy caring for the applications that 
have poured in. And they have their 
pencils all sharpened for more to 
come. 

What started this hoped-for and 
unprecedented rush ?The Wadco News 
jvas one thing. The second was a 
dash for members between two de- 
partments on the lower floor — the 
Press and Stamp Departments versus 
the Rolling and Wire Departments. 
Marshalled by Foreman Frank Gad- 
des, the Press and Stamp Rooms got 
the jump on their opponents with 
ten new members the day after the 
Wadco News came out. But the Roll- 
ers with John Brant at the head came 
back; even the next day. Neither yet 
have 100 per cent, in the Relief, but 
their competition started other de- 
partments into wild campaigning. 

The Tool Room was first to sign up 
100 per cent., the Die Cutters follow- 
ed, and now the Polishing Room has 
fallen into line. Mr. Gardner stated 
that the office was 100 per cent, 
strong, but the latest lists give it but 
86 per cent., Mr. Gardner having 
overlooked two inveterate low-hang- 
ers. The Gold A. Department reports 
93 per cent, paid in memberships. At 
the moment of going to press, word 
was received from the Receiving De- 
partment that it was 100 per cent, 
strong. Its report was verified by Mr. 
Puller. 

Mr. Fuller also gives the informa- 
tion that several other departments 
a?v working for a solid front . Get 
a move on, so that we may have 
the most solid Relief Association of 
any factory anywhere. 



You Win! 
Kitty Greve 



"Wadco News," to be the regular 
name of the shop paper, is the product 
of the fertile brain of Miss Catherine 
Greve, better known to everyone as 
Kitty, of Miss Coombs' unsoldered 
mesh department. Kitty has the cour- 
age of her convictions, for she claims 
that she knew "Wadco News" was 
good enough to win when she thought 
of it. She was presented with a gift 
of a ten-dollar gold piece from the 
managers of Hie plant. 

You can believe the trouble the 
Publication Committee had in pick- 
ing the winner when in the last count 
it was found that over one hundred 
proposals came in. Every depart- 
ment in the shop was represented by 
at least one, and some by great 
bunches of prospective names. The 
second choice of the committee was 
"Bagtopics," contributed by Frank 
Gaddcs; and the third choice was 
'•The Medmm," JJej| Higglns' happy 
thought. 



ON TO THE DANCE 

That ever popular song, "Oh, Min- 
nie, won't you shimmy for me," will 
initiate in the proper style one of the 
w ddest parlies ever staged in Plain- 
ville, to be given next Thursday night 
in the Town Hall by the W. S. Club, 
which might be the Whiting Sewing 
Club, but which for this night will 
be happily known as the Female 
Grapplers. 

These Wild, Wild, Wimen from the 
office promise that they will not de- 
velop the palsy but that they will 
merely train for the party by eating 
coffee jelly. Everyone can thus be as- 
sured that there will be great pleas- 
ure without danger. All who shake 
a mean quiver, who think they can, 
or who want to try it, are invited to 
participate in this free-for-all four- 
hour contest. Let it be known here 
and now that everybody is going. 
Myrtle Cooper, in spite of a ring, An- 
na Reynolds, Eva Contour, and all 
the many other virtuous vamps, are 
limbering up for the evening's enjoy- 
ment. The lid is off, as Bill Barton, 
for the dignified town fathers of 
Plainville, has given his consent. 



TWO ADDITIONS NOW 

UNDER CONSTRUCTION 



180 H. P. HOILER TO BE INSTALLED 



New Extension Will Consolidate 

Four Departments Into One 

Location 

Ground has been broken on the ex- 
tension to the Rolling Department 
which when finished will consolidate 
the Wire, Melting, Annealing and 
Rolling Departments into one large 
section. Construction will also short- 
ly be begun on the new boiler room, 
which will extend north from the pres- 
ent location and completely modernize 
the present equipment. 

The plans of the addition to the 
Rolling Department call for a one- 
story ell, 50 feet by 40 feet, extending 
north. The building will extend from 
the present recreation rooms under 
the Mesh Room to midway of the 
Stamp Department. The Wire De- 
partment will be shifted to the new 
location and its present location will 
be utilized by the Whiting Chain 
Company. New and enlarged rolling 
mills, capable of the heaviest work, 
will be installed, besides increased fa- 
cilities for wire drawing, thus con- 
solidating these departments. The 
new addition will contain toilet facil- 
ties for the Press, Stamp and Tool 
Rooms. The roof will be of saw tooth 
type in order to throw the maximum 
of light back into the Stamp Room. 

The new boiler room, already stak- 
ed out in the yard, will measure 40 
feet by 40 feet. In it there will be 
installed a 180 horsepower boiler of 
the most modern type. The addition 
will be of brick and steel construction 
and fireproof throughout. In the 
place of the present boilers, provis- 
ion will be made for electric gener- 
ators to be installed in the future and 
which will enable the firm to make its 
own power. The east side will be 
taken up by bins of two car capacity 
and outside a pit is to he dwj; for stor- 
age of extra supply. The bins will 
tilled with coal from the pit by 
means of an automatic conveyor. 



You our this much fo boom the plant 
Nt iu r try to sn>i you can 7. 



WADCO NEWS 



Wadco News 



Published Semi-Monthly 

by the Employees of Whiting- & Davis 

Company, Plainville, Mass. 



Publication Committee 

J. O.Gagnon, Chairman 

W. J. Fuller Lee Higgins F. Gaddes 

O. Soderstroin H. B. Rowan 



Er>iT<>r: 



W. Codding 



COMMERCIAL PaESS-PKINTESS 



EDITORIALS 



SEND IT IN 

If you have a bit of news. 

Send it in; 
Or a joke that will amuse, 

Send it in ; 
A story that is true, 
An incident that's new. 
We want to hear from you, 

Send it in. 
Never mind about the style, 
If the news is wortii the while, 
•id it in. 

— Clipped. 



WADCO NEWS 



sarly a quarter of those on the 
Whiting and Davis roster contributed 
posala in the name contest for this 
paper, now to be known as Wadco 
Nt Ws. It is this common interest in 
the affairs of the shop which the pa- 
per endeavors to foster and increase. 
Already it lias succeeded in boost- 
ing more than one department up to 
scratch with 100 per cent, enroll- 
:t in the Relief, which is a whole 
-hop affair through its benefits to 
everyone. Do not let the department 
you work in be a low hanger in shop 
affairs. Boost your department by 
joining the Relief, by giving it the 
mosl publicity in Wadco News, by 
making it distinctive in the least tar- 
• or in a hundred other worth- 
while ways. Boosl your department 
and yon l> shop. 



Baseball is over. Whj not now talk 
up inside and outside the shop the 
abilities of a bowling league com- 
prising the teams of the Twilight 
'lie and any other clubs or shops 
which might care to come in? 



MIDDLEEORO COMES THRU 



A FEW STATISTICS 



In the week ending August 21, 218 
employees of the company either came 
in late or left early, which meant a 
loss in time for the week of 290 hours. 

During the week ending August 28, 
243 men were late or left before clos- 
ing time, resulting in a loss of 321 
hours. Included in the number were 
two foremen. 

On another page of this issue, the 
"Wadco News" publishes a table set- 
ting forth what a loss in time means 
to employees. Can you afford to lose 
time? The firm cannot. 

Will you not have some pride in the 
matter ! 

(Signed) 

C. A. ^YhUi i lCJ. 



AEOUT THE SHOP 



The safety devices used on the 
presses in the Whiting and Davis 
Company rank with the best any- 
where in the country. Although gen- 
erally similar to those in use else- 
where, our safety appliances have 
been improved and made absolutely 
fool-proof by our own tool-makers. 
The devices have been admired and 
praised by several insurance compa- 
nies. 



Mr. Thompson is justly peeved 
over the growing practice to use his 
machines and tools without his per- 
mission. Only the other day some- 
one ruined his favorite saw on a per- 
fectly »ood nail. The carpenter shop, 
like the Tool Room, is a service de- 
partment. No one knows it better 
than Mr. Thompson. Everyone to his 
own trade. Let Mr. Thompson per- 
form your services. 



It is impossible for Miss Cote to in- 
terview every foreman each day in 
order to get the names of employees 
who are out sick. Each department 
should report to her the absences due 
to sickness. 



The Plainville Cemetery Association 
respectfully requests Whiting and 
Davis Company employees and all 
others to respect the Old Cemetery, 
so-called, and kindly not to make "a 
thoroughfare of this cemetery. 



By Mrs. Hattie Goodwin 
Our Middleboro Correspondent 

Wanted — news from Middleboro, 
Those are the words I hear 
Drifting in from Plainville, 
Echoing far and near. 

We have no time for gossip, 
Nor have we time for play, 
We're silently, patiently working 
For five hundred bags per day. 

Bui y;)u shall have your news, 
To produce it we will try. 
We think you really need it 
To raise your standards (hit' 

Perhaps you know our Boss 
And his methods all quite well, 
But I think you'll oe enlightened 
By seme facts I'm going to tell. 

He built the girls some dinky desks, 
By working day and night. 
He carefully placed and hinged them 
To give them better light. 

He made a slick contrivance, 
To turn their gas with ease; 
Xow he's a man of merit 
Striving ever, all to please. 

You boast of ail your salaried men 
With their limousines in a row, 
But you've nothing on us over here — 
Charlie has one — so has Joe. 

But best of all is Maxim's steed, 
A race horse, swift and s f rong. 
When lie wants to go somewhere 
It does not take him long. 

There's a Stranger in our midst, 
A StiYineer with eyes of blue, 
He's been forbidden to whistle 
And now he don't know what to do. 

He's lonely too — poor fellow, 
But then, the Boss is wise. 
It's his music the girls are keen for 
And not the Stranger's eyes. 

Good-bye, my dear Plaiirvill-ains, 
Should you hear from us no more — 
Do not think that we are napping, 
We are making bags galore. 



Louise King says you have roguish 
eyes like a dying calf. Gene. 



WADCO NEWS 



FRANK TAKES OFF WEIGHT 



Metal Terms 



Our enterprising: Mr. Gaddes, fore- 
man of the Press Department, points 
to tennis as the one game for all those 
whose avoirdupois is above par. 
Through constant playing on the 
Whiting and Davis Tennis Club 
courts this summer, Frank has drawn 
in his belt a total of three notches, 
and now looks somewhat better. 

With Frank, the Club now includes 
in its membership Ernest Toothill, 
Louis Whiting, Lee Higgins, Harvey 
Lamphier, Walter Collins, and Har- 
c!d Peasley, although others in the 
factory have taken advantage of the 
Club's welcome and used its courts. 
Every night, Saturday and Sunday, 
finds singles and doubles games in 
progress. Harvey tries hard and in 
spite of him there have been some 
particularly close matches. Among 
the closest have been those of the four 
Morgans, whose competition is a fine 
example of brotherly love. 

The club wishes to announce 
through this paper that, although it 
wel comas the use of its clubhouse, it 
requests those doing so during the 
lunch hour not to leave newspapers 
where they will blow and spoil the 
sightliness of the lawn or the courts. 



No terms are more deceiving than 
those applied to metals. Silver, for 
instance, is never found pure but is 
always mixed with a little copper. All 
gold when mined contains more or less 
silver. 

Silver is known as "sterling" when 
it is composed of 925 parts of pure 
silver to 75 parts of copper. White 
metal, generally termed "nickel sil- 
ver" or "German silver," contains 
no silver at all, but is made up of 
60 per cent, copper, 35 per cent, 
zinc and 5 per cent, nickel. If you 
heat white metal, you burn out the 
zinc and spoil the article you are 
working on. 



BASE BALL 



Ray Fulton, with a batting average 
of .400, leads the Whiting and Davis 
baseball team, in the number of hits 
produced this season. Jimmie Gleason 
played in the most games and thus 
gets the largest share of the proceeds. 
h man receives $1.00 for each 
ae he played in. The following 
standing was prepared by Scorer 
Henry Desautels. 



Plainville is to lose one of its most 
active political gangsters in the per- 
son of Byron Gardner, who will 
shortly move to North Attleboro. 

H. E. WATSON of the Bench De- 
partment, has sample books of the Al- 
fred Peats Wall Paper Company. Mr. 
Watson can obtain, for the employees 
of the Whiting and Davis Company, 
all grades of wall paper at a saving 
of 45 per cent, over other retail prices. 





No. 


Batting 


Nome 


Games 


Average 


Fulton, 


12 


.400 


Jedlinski, 


12 


.318 


Hurlin, 


10 


.300 


Shattuck, 


10 


.281 


II. Burns, 


12 


.237 


Gleeson, 


14 


.217 


Thomas, 


10 


.210 


Whiting, 


1 


.200 


E. Manchester, fi 


.160 


Hayes, 


6 


.125 


C. Burns, 


2 


.125 


G. Mancheste 


r, 10 


.111 


Crotty, 


6 


.077 


Barrows, 


1 


.000 


Where is 


Beaumont's 


average, 


Henryl He 


played in ten 


of the 


games. 







CAN YOU AFFORD IT? 



WHAT IT COSTS YOU TO BE LATE 



Rate 


LOSS OF 15 


LOSS OF 30 


LOSS OF 46 


LOSS OF 1 HOUR 


per 


MINUTES A DAY 


MINUTES A DAY 


MINUTES A DAY 


A DAY 


Hour 


AMOUNTS TO 


AMOUNTS TO 


AMOUNTS TO 


AMOUNTS TO 




PEE WEEK 

$ 30 


PER YEAR 


I'KR WEEK 


PER YEAR 


PER WEEK 


PER YEAR 


PER WEEK 


PER YEAR 


20 


$ 15 60 


$ 60 


% 31 20 


t 90 


% 46 80 


% 1 20 


* 62 40 


25 


38 


19 76 


75 


39 00 


1 13 


58 76 


1 50 


78 00 


80 


45 


23 40 


90 


46 80 


1 36 


70 20 


1 80 


93 60 


85 


53 


27 56 


1 05 


64 60 


1 58 


82 16 


2 10 


109 20 


40 


60 


31 20 


1 20 


62 40 


1 80 


93 60 


2 40 


124 80 


45 


68 


35 86 


1 35 


70 20 


2 00 


105 58 


2 70 


1 to 40 


50 


75 


39 00 


1 50 


78 00 


2 25 


117 00 


8 00 


166 00 


55 


83 


43 16 


1 65 


85 80 


2 48 


128 96 


3 30 


171 60 


60 


90 


46 80 


1 80 


93 60 


2 70 


140 40 


3 60 


1ST 20 


65 


98 


50 96 


1 95 


101 40 


2 93 


152 36 


8 90 


202 SO 


70 


1 05 


54 60 


2 10 


109 20 


8 15 


163 80 


4 20 


218 40 


75 


1 13 


58 76 


2 25 1 117 00 


3 88 


175 76 


4 


234 00 



ABOVE AMOUNTS COMPUTED ON A FIFTY-TWO WEEK YEAR 



WADCO NEWS 




The secret of Harvey's continual 
tickled expression is out. It is the 
fiies which gambol gaily about his 
baldpate. 

Hattie has acquired a sweet tooth 
— from association with Bill? 

Herman is dickering with Brant & 
Suvall Co. for a Ford in which to 
spend his vacation. Yes, he will spend 
it all right. 

We hope Charlie Quirk's recipe for 
home brew is better than the one he 
invented for a green gold solution. 

How is the factory going to run 
after this week? Winthrop Morgan 
leaves for Worcester Tech, Ralph 
Morgan for New Hampshire Agricul- 
tural College, Harold Morgan for 
Wentworth Institute, and Billy Mor- 
gan for Dean Academy, all in the next 
few days. 

Favorite Sayings: He who sticks 
his finger in the glue pot, gets stuck. — 
Olker Gagnon. Yet Ollie has just 
purchased Mr. Bice's Buick. 

Favorite Sayings: Don't, George. — 
Flor Austin. 

Mr. Soderslrom took his family on 
a tour to Maine one week and began 
his vacation minus car and family the 
t in Xew York. 

Tell us, Felix, are you bald? 



We aim to please, 
And perhaps to tease, 
In printing this paper's jokes; 
The folk worth while 
Are those who can smile 
"When given these little pokes. 



HEALTH HINTS II 



Since our new hospital has been 
installed and facilities provided for 
handling eases of sickness in the 
shop, we often he.-r this remark: 
"We are very fortunate to have 
such a good place to come for rest 
and treatment in case of accident." 

But although every comfort has 
been provided, these facilities have 
not been furnished for the treat" 
cnent of a coid e n &g and sickness that 
might be avoided. Many accidents 
arc the result of failure to keep in 
trim. Yon cannot keep in trim and 
be on the alert if you keep late 
hours, skip your meals, fail to take 
sufficiejil ex< rcise. 

Headaches, nervousness, indiges- 
tion, result from such practices. 
Keep in trim. 

(Signed) 

Bertha Q. Coin. 



Jim Coyne went on a fishing trip 
last Saturday. He got a lot of bites 
but no fish, the reason being that the 
fish was on the wrong end of the line. 

Who took the gas out of Harry 
Crowther's car? Harry promises no 
insult to the guilty, but says nothing 
about injury. 

The old place looks good to Normau 
Clarke. We welcome him back to the 
Tool Room. 

We wonder if Miss Bnllukian 



would like to ride in a brand new tin- 
lizzie. 

Our paymaster, Bob, is wearing a 
smile that increases in breadth every 
day. We wonder how rooxi Ihe wed- 
ding will come off. 

A little visitor came to Billv Glen- 
non's home last week — a girl. Billy 
now wants to know the precautions 
to take to avoid bow-leggedness. 

Clarence Skinner, chauffenr of the 
Roo, came in full of smiles'the other 
morning. The baby must have said 
'•da-da/' 

Time ! Custom ! 
AVill courage never die? 
The daring nerve, the flaming curve, 
Of Dandelion's tie. 

Henry Hemingson is now able to 
work after his two weeks in Canada. 

We welcome Ernest C4unner to the 
die-cutting force and Raymond Pick- 
ering to the Coloring Room. 

Henry Desautelle may be consid- 
ered dense, but his assistant is consid- 
erably Denzer. 

An example of Eddie's wit: 

"How do you spell Coren's last 
name?" 

Eddie: "That's not a name. It's a 
collision of the alphabet." 

From the Repair Department comes 
word that Anna is known as a reg- 
ular vamp to all the gents at the va- 
cation place she went to. Well, it's 
belter to have vamped and lost, than 
never to have vamped at all. 



Don: "Do you know why Louise's 
neck is like her typewriter?" 

Eddie: "No, why is it?" 

Don : ' ' Because it is Underwood. ' ' 

One thing the whole shop would 
like to see: Goyette without a "kick." 
A word to the wise is useless. 

We don't want you to feel neglect- 
ed, Eva, because your name was not 
in the last issue. Here it is. 

Dan dated up two of the finest the 
other night. He told ~S\r. Chief In- 
spector Victor Zilch, who has a flivver, 
Mr. Zilch drove up and saw the two 
boiler makers, and then drove right off 
again. 

The DjerKiss Company announces 
that Miss Lucinda Moore is now 
among its largest customers. 

Jimmie Smith has sold his Ford 
and purchased a Mitchell, and Joe de 
Mateos has sAvapped his flivver for a 
Dodge. 

Our one and oiily Sam Kenyon 
wants to buy a Buick S ; x and beat the 
tin horns who drive up to work in 
Henrys. 

Andrew Stevens of the Press De- 
partment finds the use of "kick" in 
the gas is a great help in making the 
Falls hill on high. 

Ask the office girls how they liked 
tin 1 watermelon that Louise King 
treated them with. 

Adeline Longbardy is tired of shak- 
ing bags and has taken a position in 
Boston. 

That screaming we heard last Fri- 
day was from the eagle on a two-bit 
piece that Bill Sweet was holding. 

Matt Brennan has recently invent- 
ed a smokeless dip and a stripless 
strip which work fine on paper. 

Married life doesn't phase Olga 
Swanson a 'hit. The fatal word has 
been said and the ceremony will take 
place sometime in the fall. In the 
meantime Olga determines to learn 
from John Olsen the difference be- 
tween corn beef hash and oysters. 

The drinking fountain and a straw- 
berry blonde are side by side in the 
Mesh Room. Which is the attraction, 

Sam ? 

Don't forget that dance next Thurs- 
day that the W. S. Club is giving.